The revival of Rosé brings a blush to anyone’s cheeks

When WOSA launched their ‘Spectacular South Africa’ campaign to promote South African wines during this incredibly challenging time for the industry, the TOPS at SPAR Wine Show team jumped at the opportunity to make a contribution by promoting South African wines. Last month we showcased Chenin, this month it’s Rosé’s turn to blush in the spotlight.

 

Rosé is gaining interest worldwide, with South Africa hot on the heels of this trend, but the truth is that Rosé is much more than just a fad; in fact, more Rosé is now consumed in France than white wine.

Rosé wines, often referred to as blush wines, represent a spectrum of colours from the palest salmon to the deepest pink. They are made in one of two ways: from a blend of red- and white-wine grape varieties; or from red-wine grapes only. In South Africa, Rosé wines are also crafted from Pinotage, a local cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsaut. This is what produces the characteristic Rosé-wine colour.

Rosé is gaining interest worldwide, with South Africa hot on the heels of this trend, but the truth is that Rosé is much more than just a fad; in fact, more Rosé is now consumed in France than white wine.

Rosé wines, often referred to as blush wines, represent a spectrum of colours from the palest salmon to the deepest pink. They are made in one of two ways: from a blend of red- and white-wine grape varieties; or from red-wine grapes only. In South Africa, Rosé wines are also crafted from Pinotage, a local cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsaut. This is what produces the characteristic Rosé-wine colour.

TOPS at SPAR Wine Show co-owner, Shon Kumar is a big fan of Rosé and we asked him to share some if his insights: “In its previous life, Rosé was always accepted as the cheap, sweet alternative to wine for non-wine drinkers. But, over the last five years the quality of Rosé wines in South Africa has surged, offering wine lovers a refreshingly fruity yet crisp version of its older self. Rosé has increased in popularity because it pairs very well with lighter, modern styles of food and is great to share with friends. It is an easy-drinking wine and perfectly suited to our warm climate and relaxed lifestyle in South Africa.”

 

Along with the rest of the world, South Africa has discovered the delights of easy-going, good quality Rosés. There has been a general rise in interest for Rosé wines and this has even transferred across to MCC. People love the colour: it feels like a real celebration when you have a glass of pink bubbles in your hand.

Unfortunately, good quality never comes cheap. Crafting a high-quality Rosé is a labour-intensive and time-consuming process. It requires a lot of care to balance the colour, tannin and flavour through skin contact during the fermentation process.

TOPS at SPAR Wine Show asked award-winning Sommelier, Miguel Chan what his top five Rosé wines are to guide in your next purchase as soon as the sale of alcohol resumes!

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